Sex victims

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sexvictims.com

You are not alone!

For many sexvictims, the effects can be wide-ranging and lifelong. They can experience physical injuries, long-term mental health effects, and disruption to everyday activities such as eating and sleeping habits.

No one ever deserves or asks for it to happen.
No matter where you were, what you were doing, what you were wearing, what you were saying, if you were drunk or under the influence of drugs, you did not deserve this.

It is not your fault.

The responsibility always lies with the attacker, not the victim.

The term “victim” means a person who has suffered direct physical, emotional, or pecuniary harm as a result of the commission of a crime.

In the United States, in Europe, in Australia and some other countries “victims” are expressly afforded certain rights and services to assist during and in the aftermath of the commission of that crime.

For these reasons, within this site, editors still make extensive use of this term.

Adopting survivor and trauma-informed approaches should not conflict or compete with the provision of assistance entitled to victims.

Sex victims statistics

Protect our future, prevent child abuse today.

Younger People Are
at the Highest Risk of Sexual Violence

Ages 12-34 are the highest risk years for rape and sexual assault. Ages 65 and older are 92% less likely than 12-24 year olds to be a victim of rape or sexual assault.

Child sexual abuse is a form of child abuse that includes sexual activity with a minor. A child cannot consent to any form of sexual activity, period. When a perpetrator engages with a child this way, they are committing a crime that can have lasting effects on the victim for years. Child sexual abuse does not need to include physical contact between a perpetrator and a child. The majority of perpetrators are someone the child or family knows

Women and Girls
Experience Sexual Violence at High Rates

Rape is a form of sexual assault, but not all sexual assault is rape. The term rape is often used as a legal definition to specifically include sexual penetration without consent.

Victims of sexual assault may seek informal support (such as talking to a friend or family member), formal support (such as from police and legal services, health professionals or housing assistance providers) or may not seek help at all. Victim responses may be influenced by whether or not they
sustained a physical injury or experienced other health and wellbeing consequences.

Men and Boys
Are Also Affected by Sexual Violence

Men and boys who have been sexually assaulted or abused may also face some additional challenges because of social attitudes and stereotypes about men and masculinity.

Sexual Assault of Men and Boys
Sexual assault can happen to anyone, no matter your age, sexual orientation, or gender identity. Men and boys who have been sexually assaulted or abused may have many of the same feelings and reactions as other survivors of sexual assault, but they may also face some additional challenges because of social attitudes and stereotypes about men and masculinity.

“Research shows that women are more often attacked by someone they know and trust. This may be their boyfriend, husband or partner and can happen in the context of an intimate relationship. They may have been sexually abused as a child by an adult known to them..”

“You always have the right to say no to sex, whether or not you have previously had consensual sex with someone.”

“Sexual assault is a major health and welfare issue in USA, Europe, Australia and worldwide. The term "sexual violence" is an all-encompassing, non-legal term that refers to crimes like sexual assault, rape, and sexual abuse. It can happen to anyone – women, men, girls and boys – of every age, race, sexual orientation and religious background. !”

Some things you want to know and understand

The term “sexual violence” is an all-encompassing, non-legal term that refers to crimes like sexual assault, rape, and sexual abuse. It can happen to anyone – women, men, girls and boys – of every age, race, sexual orientation and religious background.

When a perpetrator intentionally harms a minor physically, psychologically, sexually, or by acts of neglect, the crime is known as child abuse.Child sexual abuse is a form of child abuse that includes sexual activity with a minor. A child cannot consent to any form of sexual activity, period. When a perpetrator engages with a child this way, they are committing a crime that can have lasting effects on the victim for years. Child sexual abuse does not need to include physical contact between a perpetrator and a child. 

Sexual assault is a type of sexual violence that involves any physical contact, or intent of contact, of
a sexual nature against a person’s will, using physical force, intimidation or coercion (ABS 2011; AIHW
2019a). It can be aggravated in nature (including rape, attempted rape, sexual assault with a weapon,
indecent assault, penetration by objects, forced sexual activity that did not end in penetration, attempts
to force a person into sexual activity) or non-aggravated in nature (such as indecent assault without
aggravating circumstances or threat of sexual activity) (ABS 2011). Aggravated sexual assault is
non-consensual, either as a result of the victim not providing consent to the activity or the victim being
too young to legally provide consent (Box 1). Both aggravated and non-aggravated sexual assault are
offences under state and territory criminal law. There is some variation in the definition of sexual assault
used across international data sources

Many men who experienced an erection or ejaculation during the assault may be confused and wonder what this means. These normal physiological responses do not in any way imply that you wanted, invited, or enjoyed the assault. If something happened to you, know that it is not your fault and you are not alone.

The number of rapes that occur globally each year is also difficult to estimate due to underreporting and varying definitions of what constitutes rape in different countries. However, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), it is estimated that globally, approximately 1 in 3 women (35%) have experienced physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence or non-partner sexual violence in their lifetime.

Additionally, according to UN Women, it is estimated that 1 in 20 women (or 5%) will experience rape or attempted rape in their lifetime. It is important to note that these statistics are estimates, and the actual number of rapes that occur globally may be higher, as many cases go unreported due to stigma, fear of retaliation, or lack of trust in the criminal justice system.

It is difficult to estimate the exact number of child abuse cases that occur globally each year due to underreporting and varying definitions of child abuse in different countries. However, according to the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), an estimated 1 in 4 children worldwide have experienced physical, sexual, or emotional violence or neglect in their lifetime. UNICEF also reports that every year, an estimated 1 billion children are affected by some form of violence, exploitation, or abuse.
Child abuse can take many forms, including physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, and neglect. It can have serious and long-lasting impacts on a child’s physical, emotional, and psychological well-being, and can contribute to a range of negative outcomes later in life.

Estimating the exact number of sex trafficking victims globally per year is difficult due to the hidden and illegal nature of the crime, and the fact that many cases go unreported. However, according to the International Labour Organization (ILO), it is estimated that there are approximately 4.8 million victims of forced sexual exploitation globally at any given time.
It’s important to note that this number is an estimate and may not accurately reflect the actual number of victims. Additionally, it’s important to recognize that sex trafficking is a serious and pervasive issue that affects individuals of all genders and ages, in all regions of the world.


Say NO to sexual violence.

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